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Written by: Darlene D'Altorio-Jones (1959-2015) on Monday, April 4, 2011 Posted in: Inpatient Rehab

A little work up front in creating reports, dashboards, benchmarks and feed-forward operational information can save extensive re-work, disappointment and possibly risk mitigation for take backs.

Unfortunately, managers rarely take the time to answer core questions on what they need to manage effectively for the various responsibilities they have day-to-day. To make a list of the entire checks and balances would be exhaustive, there are many dotted I’s and crossed T’s behind the scenes for why we do the things we do and what holds priority in real life day-to-day “fires.” Every stakeholder to our business and every regulation, law, guideline and process demands value as an outcome that leaders are held accountable towards.

Yet managers and leaders need tools and information to lead successfully! Checks and balances are necessary and those that impact those outcomes should understand the reasons for why we demand specific norms. Feed forward, check back; does it meet your expectation?

I challenge rehabilitation managers to create a list of the requirements within their job description and what they actually chase day-to-day to accomplish work that often goes beyond eight hours. By making that list and prioritizing its contents, I believe each manager/leader can establish new norms simply by gathering information in advance that adds value toward decisions.

Given good reports, leaders and managers can quickly assess problematic issues whether they are clinical or operational in nature and then have more time to create solutions to keep those areas in check. Without adequate reports, gathering the same information repeatedly is a waste of precious time that can be used to solve issues before they reach a breaking point.

If you begin your day with meaningful information, each day can be spent mentoring the best possible patient experiences. Even as managers, the patient comes first.

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