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Recorded Webinar with Dr. Charles S. Cox Jr.: Cellular Therapies for Neurological Injury

Recorded: Friday, February 3

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Watch this webinar to hear Dr. Charles S. Cox Jr., who is a professor of pediatric surgery and the George and Cynthia Mitchell Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience as well as the director of the Pediatric Surgical Translational Laboratories and Pediatric Program in Regenerative Medicine at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, discuss various stem and progenitor cellular therapies as potential treatments for neurological injuries, the differences between these many cell types, preclinical and early clinical trials occurring in the field, and future outlooks.

Webinar Summary

There are currently no reparative therapies for severe neurological injuries. Recently, however, a wide range of stem/progenitor cellular therapies have emerged as potential treatments for neurological injuries. These cell types include umbilical cord blood, bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cells, stromal cells and related expanded bone-marrow-derived-cells, amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, oligodendrocyte precursors, and others.

Initially, preclinical data supported the concept of transdifferentiation of bone-marrow-derived cells, but this has largely been disproven. However, preclinical and early clinical trials demonstrate proof-of-concept functional improvements in multiple injury models, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and hypoxia-ischemia. Data derived from multiple laboratories point toward modulation of the innate immune response to injury and the microglia in particular as the effector cells influenced by various infused cell types.

Understanding the mechanisms of action of these cell types is important in designing clinical applications/protocols as it affects routes of delivery, dosing, and biomarker assays. In this webinar, we will discuss the state of the field in terms of early clinical trials and preclinical data and will assess the future of the field.

Attendees will learn:

  • Historical perspective of the development of preclinical data in the field
  • How to differentiate between various cell types
  • Benefits of potential pleiotropic mechanisms of action
  • How to be a better critical reviewer of the literature

Charles S. Cox Jr., M.D., discusses various stem and progenitor cellular therapies as potential treatments for neurological injuries and why understanding the mechanisms of action plays an important role in designing clinical applications.

Speaker Bio

 

Dr. Charles S. Cox Jr. is a professor of pediatric surgery and the George and Cynthia Mitchell Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience, directing the Pediatric Surgical Translational Laboratories and Pediatric Program in Regenerative Medicine at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. He is co-director of the Texas Trauma Institute and directs the Pediatric Trauma Program at the University of Texas-Houston/Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital in the Texas Medical Center.

A Texas native, Dr. Cox received his undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Austin. Upon graduating from the University of Texas Medical Branch, he completed his surgery residency at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston and further post-graduate fellowships in pediatric surgery at the University of Michigan, an NIH T32 sponsored clinical and research fellowship in cardiopulmonary support/circulatory support devices/bio-hybrid organs at the Shriner’s Burns Institute, and surgical critical care/trauma at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. He is certified by the American Board of Surgery in surgery with added qualifications in pediatric surgery and surgical critical care. Dr. Cox also served in Afghanistan with the 82nd Airborne in the 909th Forward Surgical Team in 2002.

The Pediatric Translational Laboratories and Pediatric Program in Regenerative Medicine represent a multi-disciplinary effort that addresses problems that originate with traumatic injury and the consequences of resuscitation and critical care. The program focuses on progenitor-cell-based therapy (stem cells) for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and related neurological injuries (hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, stroke, spinal cord injury), recently completing the first acute, autologous cell therapy treatment Phase I study for traumatic brain injury in children as well as a DOD-funded Phase 1/2a trial for severe TBI in adults (2015). Recently, the NIH funded the first Phase IIb clinical trial for cellular therapies in children with severe TBI, and the DOD Joint Warfighter Program has funded a Phase 2b trial in adults (2016-2020). The program has been continuously funded since 1998 through the National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense/MRMC, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board/Emerging Technology Funds, industry collaboration (Athersys, Inc.; Celgene Cellular Therapeutics; CBR, Inc.), and philanthropic contributions. The program is housed in state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and includes two cGMP, Class 10,000 facilities for the production of clinical grade cell and tissue products: Hoffberger Cellular Therapeutics Laboratory and the Griffin Stem Cell Therapeutics Research Laboratory.

Dr. Cox is the author of more than 150 scientific publications, 20 book chapters, and is the editor of two texts: Progenitor Cell Therapy for Neurological Injury and Cellular Therapy for Neurological Injury.

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