Recorded Webinar with Dr. Greg Denomme: Integration of Mass-Scale Cell Genotyping into the Blood Supply Chain

Watch the recorded webinar to hear Dr. Greg Denomme, senior investigator at Blood Research Institute and director of immunohematology and transfusion services at BloodCenter of Wisconsin, discuss the effect that red cell genotyping has on the supply chain and the challenges faced by blood centers to utilize the data.

 Webinar Summary

Phenotyping is often used to find antigen-negative donor blood units for transfusion to patients with specific needs. Because many phenotyping methods are labor-intensive and costly, some blood centers are attempting to replace traditional phenotyping with molecular methods that use DNA rather than red cells. Will this change impact America’s blood supply chain? In this webinar, Dr. Greg Denomme, Ph.D., provides an overview of the effects that red cell genotyping has on the blood supply chain and the challenges faced by blood centers to use the data.

You Will Learn:

  • The difference between a phenotype and a genotype
  • How a genotype is converted into a (predicted) phenotype
  • The requirements necessary for the use of historical phenotypes or genotypes to label a unit of blood
  • To recognize one gap created by the use of mass-scale cell genotyping

Greg Denomme, Ph.D., discusses the challenges and integration of mass-scale cell genotyping into the blood supply chain.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Greg Denomme, Ph.D., is senior investigator at Blood Research Institute and director of immunohematology and transfusion services at BloodCenter of Wisconsin. He is a preeminent expert on RBC molecular testing. Dr. Denomme leads BloodCenter of Wisconsin’s Immunohematology Reference Laboratory clinical translation activities for donor and patient red cell genotyping. His work applies immunopathology and immunogenetics to the field of transfusion medicine.

Dr. Denomme’s interests include:
• The molecular basis of blood group expression
• The effect of immune polymorphisms on hemolytic anemia
• The mechanisms of antibody-mediated suppression of erythropoiesis